Monday, May 5, 2014

Monday Musing: Mapping Quiet Spaces

These musings started as my self assigned "15 minute to comment on a story in the news." I've been blowing my time limit, lately, so today I'm setting my stopwatch and sticking to my original intent: briefly commenting on an article I've shared via Twitter or Dispatches from the Future of Museums and explaining why I think it is worth paying attention to.

Last week the Ecopreneurist wrote about Stereopublic, an app and website that invites people to map oases of calm in the city, mini-places of respite and retreat. 

It's important to remember that people value museums for various reasons. At any given time, a person might want to be informed or entertained. They may want a "third place" where they can kick back and socialize with friends. Sometimes some people may just want a place to be quiet, a refuge from the noise and hustle of the urban environment. 

Stereopublic's website says, "Welcome to a quieter world. People from many cities across the earth have been adding spaces of solace and retreat for you to find. Use the map to find your own space." The app includes original music compositions associated with some pre-loaded sites. Other sites, tagged by the crowd, may include a picture, or just GPS coordinates.

So, my musing: wonder how many folks have their own secret "quiet space" in a museum, where they retreat to rest and reflect? Do you? I'm going to keep an eye on the app, to see how many museum galleries or courtyards, botanic gardens or historic sites show up on it's roster. Just one more way to measure how people value, and use, our wonderful spaces.

14 minutes, 28 second: Boom, done. Mission accomplished. :) 


Beth said...

I have a few favorite "quiet spaces" in my museum. You've inspired me to go add them!

Erin Dreyfuss said...

I love getting lost in the World of Mammals exhibit at the Field Museum in Chicago. It is always quiet back there!

Unknown said...

This could be great, too, for museum-goers that might need a quieter space — kids with autism or older adults who are hard of hearing, for instance. Very cool idea!